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2016 Books

I read 28 Books in 2016.

2016 favorite:

"Dead Wake: The Last Crossing of the Lusitania," by Erik Larson

2016 Most Educational:
"The Right To Vote The Contested History Of Democracy In The United States," by Alexander Keyssar

2016 Best Horror:
"A Head Full of Ghosts," by Paul Tremblay

2016 Best Cybersecurity:

The Phoenix Project: A Novel About IT, DevOps, and Helping Your Business Win," by Gene Kim

I recommend:
"Anathem" by Neal Stephenson
"The Magicians" by Lev Grossman
"Steve Jobs" by Walter Isaacson

Personal Challenge Complete:
All eight books of Stephen King's Dark Tower fantasy epic.

Goodreads (Facebook for book Lovers):
Check out my bookshelves on Goodreads - where you can see what your friends are reading.

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Executive Summary
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Executive Summary

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